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Doesn’t have the munchies: Canadian medical marijuana patient on hunger strike due to difficulty receiving cannabis

By Sean McCaughan
Nov 07, 2018

The legalization of recreational marijuana in Canada is leaving a critical gap in coverage for medical cannabis patients. A man in Nova Scotia has been on a hunger strike since last week to protest the high price of recreational cannabis, said High Times. This isn’t as simple as somebody complaining about the high price of getting high.

Bob Dillman has taken medical marijuana for years, under Health Canada, to treat his work-related lower back injury which happened in 2008 along with a plethora of other problems such as organ problems and digestive issues. He blames recreational legalization for lack of quantity and quality of medical grade herb.

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According to globalnews.ca, the Nova Scotia Liquor Corp. is the only licensed retailer allowed to sell cannabis in Nova Scotia, and the product they sell doesn’t meet Dillman’s needs. “The stuff they have at the liquor store, it’ll kill me. I have proof of that because there’s people I know that have tried that stuff and got sick,” Dillman said. He said he can’t have herb that has come in contact with pesticides. “I have to have organic cannabis, that I know where it came from. If I don’t know where it came from, I can’t smoke it.”

“As much as the government would hate to admit it, they’ve kind of thrown the patients under the bus. Recreational [cannabis] is all they were really worried about,” said Chris Backer, vice-chair of Maritimers Unite for Medical Marijuana. He also noted that shortages due to recreational legalization are preventing medical marijuana patients from getting the product they need.

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“I have no access. This is not legalization. … It’s eliminating the competition so they can monopolize on cannabis.” says Dillman, who says his worker’s comp is only giving him three of the five grams a day he needs to function.

“Explain this to me how this can be, or I am not going to eat one scrap of food. I’m just going to drink water and tonic water, that’s it, until I get heard,” Dillman said. “Because if they’re going to kill me one way, no. I’ll go my way.”

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